Appendix III. Love, Kindness and Compassion in Early Buddhist Literature

Quotations with an asterisk are the words of the Buddha’s disciples or of later Buddhist commentators.

Mettā should be cultivated
For oneself and others also.
All should be suffused with mettā
This is the teaching of the Buddhas.
~ Mil.394

Develop the meditation that is mettā, for by so doing, hatred will be got rid of. Develop the meditation that is compassion, for by doing so, harming will be got rid of. Develop the meditation that is sympathetic joy, for by doing so, dislike will be got rid of. Develop the meditation that is equanimity, for by doing so, sensory reaction will be got rid of. Develop the meditation on the impure, for by doing so, attachment will be got rid of. Develop the meditation that is the perception of impermanence, for by doing so, the “I am” conceit will be got rid of. ~ M.I,424

In whatever place monks dwell in strife and contention, given to arguments and stabbing each other with the weapon of the tongue, I am reluctant to think of going there, let alone actually going there … But wherever monks are dwelling in concord, harmony and agreement, like milk and water mixed, looking upon each other with the eyes of love, I am happy about going there, let alone thinking of going there. I think: “Surely, these monks have given up three things and have cultivated three things. And what three things have they given up? Sensual thoughts, thoughts of ill-will and thoughts of harming. And what three things have they cultivated? Thoughts of letting go, thoughts of love and thoughts of helpfulness. ~ A.I,275

Sakka, the ruler of the gods asked the Lord: “What is it that so binds gods, humans … and other beings so that despite wanting to live with amity and love, free from violence, hostility and hatred, they nonetheless live without amity and love: violent, hostile and hating?” “Ruler of the gods, it is because gods, humans … and other beings are bound by jealousy and selfishness so that despite wanting to live with amity and love, free from violence, hostility and hatred, they nonetheless live without amity and love: violent, hostile and hating.” ~ D.II,276

Then Venerable Sariputta said: “There are these five ways of putting away malice that arises. What five? Take the case of a person who is impure in deed but not in word. Suppose a monk who wears rag robes were to see a rag on the road. He would hold it with his left foot, spread it out with his right foot to see if he could make use of it, and then proceed on his way. In the same way, for one who is impure in deed but not in word, his deed ought to be disregarded. Think instead about his ways that are pure.

And concerning one whose words are impure but who is pure in deed, how should malice be put away? Suppose a man, tortured and overcome by heat, exhausted, wearied, craving, and thirsty were to come upon a pond overgrown with mossy slime and water plants. He would dive into the pond, scatter the water plants this way and that, cup his hands, drink, and then go his way refreshed. In the same way, for one whose words are impure but who is pure in deed, his words ought to be disregarded. Think instead about his ways that are pure.

And what of one whose words and deeds are both impure, but who occasionally attains mental clarity and calm? Suppose a man, tortured and overcome by heat, exhausted, wearied, craving, and thirsty, were to come upon a puddle in a cow’s footprint.

He might think: ‘If I drink from this puddle using my hands or a cup I will stir up the mud and make it unfit to drink. I will crouch down on all fours, bend low and drink, as does a cow.’

Then he does this. In the same way, for one whose words and deeds are both impure but who occasionally attains mental clarity and calm from time to time, his words and deeds ought to be disregarded. Think only of his clarity and calm.

And what of one whose words and deeds are both impure and who cannot even occasionally attain mental clarity and calm? Suppose a sick, ailing and grievously ill man was going along a highway with no village in front or behind, unable to get proper food, medicine or attention, or even a guide to the next village.

If another man were to see him, he might feel pity and he might say to himself: ‘This poor man! He should get help or he will suffer to his detriment.’

In the same way, for one whose ways are impure and who cannot even occasionally attain mental clarity and calm, pity, compassion and commiseration ought to arise and you should think: ‘This poor man! He should give up the bad and develop the good, or else after death he will have a bad rebirth.’

And concerning one whose words and deeds are both pure and who has mental clarity and calm, how should malice be put away? Suppose a man, tortured and overcome by heat, wearied, craving, and thirsty were to come upon a pool of sweet, cool, limpid water, a lovely resting place shaded by all kinds of trees. He would dive into the pond, bathe, drink and then come out and lie in the shade. In the same way, of this person, think about this person’s pure words, deeds and his mental clarity and calm.” ~ A.III,186-7*

Speak loving words, words rejoiced at and welcomed, words that bear ill-will to none; always speak lovingly to others. ~ Sn.452

So long as the monks show bodily acts of mettā, verbal acts of mettā and mental acts of mettā towards each other, both in public and in private, it can be expected that they we will not decline but flourish. ~ D.II,80

A monk should develop mettā to himself and to all others, individually and generally. The friendly should be suffused with friendliness, the hostile should be suffused with friendliness, and so should all those in-between. Everyone, individually and generally, should be suffused with mettā and compassion, sympathetic joy and equanimity, and one’s behaviour towards them should be motivated by the four Brahma Viharas. ~ Ja.II,61*

Practising mettā, equanimity, compassion, freedom (of mind) and sympathetic joy all in good time, you should wander alone like a rhinoceros. ~ Sn.73

There are these five ways of overcoming malice which ought to be overcome when it arises. What five? In whomever malice arises, that one should develop mettā. In whomever malice arises, that one should develop compassion. In whomever malice arises, that one should develop equanimity. In whomever malice arises, that one should forget about it, pay no attention to it. In whomever malice arises, that one should consider the fact that it is of his own making and he should think: “This is of my own making, the outcome of actions; actions are its matrix, actions are its kin and foundation. And whatever one does, good or bad, one will become an heir to that.” In these five ways malice should be put away. ~ A.III,185

Seeing conflict as a danger
And harmony as peace,
Abide in unity and kind-heartedness.
This is the teaching of the Buddhas. ~ Cp.371*

Be unrivalled in mettā if you wish to attain enlightenment. ~ Ja.I,24*

There are three types of people in the world. What three? One who is like carving on a rock, one who is like scratching on the ground, and one who is like writing on the water. What sort of person is like carving on a rock? Imagine a certain person who is always getting angry and his anger lasts long, just as carving on a rock is not soon worn off by wind, water or the passing of time. What sort of person is like scratching on the ground? Imagine a certain person who is always getting angry but his anger does not last long, just as scratching on the ground is soon worn off by the wind, water and the passing of time. And what sort of person is like writing on the water? Imagine a certain person who, even though spoken to harshly, sharply and roughly, is easily reconciled and becomes agreeable and friendly, just as writing on the water soon disappears. ~ A.I,283

The Venerable Sariputta said: “When a teacher wishes to instruct another, let him arouse five things in himself and then do so. What five? He should think: ‘I will speak at the right time, not at the wrong time. I will speak about what is, not about what is not. I will speak with gentleness, not with harshness. I will speak about the goal, not about what is not the goal. I will speak with a mind filled with mettā, not with a mind filled with ill-will.’ When a teacher wishes to instruct another, let him first establish well these five things.” ~ A.III.196*

Always mindful, developing immeasurable mettā.
The fetters are seen to weaken, the defilements destroyed.
If with a pure mind one has mettā for even a single being
One can be rightfully called skilful.
But relating to all beings with sympathy creates abundant merit. ~ A.IV.151

If speech has five qualities it is well-spoken, not ill-spoken, not blameworthy or condemned by the wise. What five? It is spoken at the right time, it is spoken in truth, it is spoken gently, it is spoken about the goal, and it is spoken with a mind of mettā. ~ A.III,243-4

When with a mind of mettā
One feels compassion for
All the world; above, below and across,
Unlimited and everywhere,
Filled with infinite kindness,
Complete and fully developed;
Any limited actions one may have done
Do not linger in the mind. ~ Ja.II,61*

Thinking about your own welfare is enough to diligently strive for the goal. Thinking about the welfare of others is enough to diligently strive for the goal. Thinking about one’s own and others’ welfare is enough to diligently strive for the goal. ~ S.II,29

After fulfilling the Perfections in the past, and sitting at the foot of the Bodhi Tree, they become perfectly enlightened Buddhas. Endowed with virtue and concentration, wisdom and freedom, knowledge and insight into freedom, with truth, sympathy, compassion and forbearance, they arouse and develop mettā towards all beings. ~ Ja.I,213-14*

Jivaka said: “I have heard this said that it is sublime to abide in mettā and the Lord is proof of this because I can see that he abides in mettā.” The Lord replied: “Any lust, hatred or delusion which could give rise to ill-will has been abandoned by the Tathagata, cut off at the root, made like a palm tree stump, finished, unable to grow again in the future. If that is what you are referring to Jivaka, then I agree with you.” ~ M.I,369

Therefore the Dhamma is well-taught by me, made clear, opened up, made apparent and free from coverings, so that all who have enough faith in me, enough love for me, are bound for heaven. ~ M.I,142

As water is poised and naturally cool, even so, the earnest student of meditation, out of compassion for all beings and seeking their welfare, should be possessed of patience, mettā and empathy. ~ Mil.383*

This is what should be done by one skilled in good
and who aspires to attain that state of peace.
He should be capable, straightforward, very straightforward,
easy to speak to, gentle, humble,

Contented, easily supported,
with few duties and with a simple lifestyle,
with calmed senses, energetic, not impudent,
and not greedy about the families he begs from.

He should do nothing mean
that the wise would rebuke him for,
and he should think:
“Let all creatures be safe and happy.”

Whatever beings there be, moving or still,
long, large, middle-sized or small, significant or insignificant,
seen or unseen, living near or far, existing or not yet come into existence,
let them all be happy.

One should not humiliate another,
or despise anyone anywhere.
One should not wish pain on another
out of either anger or disgust.

Just as a mother would protect her
one and only child with her life,
so should you cultivate
an unbounded mind towards all beings,

And mettā towards the whole world.
One should develop an unbounded mind,
above, below, across, free from obstruction,
free from hatred, free from rivalry.

And whether standing, walking, sitting, or lying down,
as long as there is no drowsiness,
one should be mindful.
This is said to be the highest state here.

Not tangled up in false opinions,
virtuous, endowed with wisdom,
no longer greedy for sensual pleasures,
such a one does not return to a womb. ~ Sn.143-152

There is no taste equal to love. The four sweet things given with indifference are not as tasty as coarse millet given with love. ~ Ja.III,142*

Of all the grounds for making merit for the next life, none of them are worth a sixteenth part of the mettā that frees the mind. The mettā that frees the mind surpasses them and illuminates, glows and shines. Just as the radiance of all stars is not worth a sixteenth part of the moon’s radiance; just as in the last month of the rainy season in the autumn, when the sky is clear and free from clouds, the sun rises into the sky and flashes, radiates and dispels all darkness; just as in the pre-dawn light the healing star shines, flashes and radiates; so too, whatever good deeds one might do for the purpose of a good rebirth, none of them are worth a sixteenth part of that mettā which frees the mind. It is the mettā that frees the mind which illuminates, glows and shines, surpassing all those good deeds. ~ It.20

Mettā
is characterised as promoting the welfare of others. Its function is to desire their welfare. It is manifested as the removal of annoyance. Its proximate cause is seeing the lovableness in beings. It succeeds when it makes ill-will subside, and it fails when it gives rise to selfish affection.

Compassion is characterised as removing the suffering of others. Its function is not to be able to beat the suffering of others. It is manifested as kindness. Its proximate cause is seeing helplessness in those overwhelmed by suffering. It succeeds when it makes cruelty subside, and it fails when it gives rise to sorrow.

Sympathetic joy is characterised as joy in the success of others. Its function is being free from envy. It is manifested as the elimination of aversion. Its proximate cause is seeing others’ success. It succeeds when it makes aversion subside, and it fails when it gives rise to merriment.

Equanimity is characterised as promoting equipoise towards beings. Its function is to see the equality in beings. It is manifested as quieting like and dislike. Its proximate cause is seeing the ownership of deeds thus: “Beings are heirs to their deeds. Whose, if not theirs, is the choice by which they will become happy, or will be free from suffering, or will not fall away from the success they have reached?” It succeeds when it makes like and dislike subside, and it fails when it gives rise to the indifference of ignorance based on the household life. ~ Vism.318*

With passions gone and faults dispelled, one develops a mind of boundless mettā. Fully aware whether by day or night one suffuses this boundlessness (of mind) in all directions. ~ Sn.507

Conquer anger with love,
Evil with good,
Meanness with generosity,
And lies with truth. ~ Dhp.223

If one were to give the gift of a hundred coins in the morning, again at noon and once again at night, or instead, if one were to develop the mind of mettā in the morning, again at noon and once again at night, even for as long as it takes to pull a cow’s udder, this would be by far the more beneficial of the two. Therefore, you should train yourself thinking: “We will develop the liberation of the mind through mettā. We will practise it often. We will make it our vehicle and foundation. We will take our stand upon it, store it up and promote it.” ~ S.II,264

As hot water softens anything that can be softened and makes it pliable, so too the words of the Tathagata even when harsh are for good purpose and are imbued with compassion. ~ Mil.172*

A noble disciple who is without longing and hatred, who is unconfused and has all-around dwells pervading the four directions with a mind filled with mettā, compassion, sympathetic joy, and equanimity. Above, below, across and everywhere, to all as to himself he dwells pervading the whole world with a mind filled with mettā, compassion, sympathetic joy and equanimity that is expansive, pervasive, immeasurable and utterly devoid of hatred or enmity. Such a disciple has these four confidences.

He can think: “If there is another world, if good and bad deeds have a result, then when my body disintegrates after death I will be reborn in a good place or in a heaven realm.”

This is the first confidence he can have. Or he can think: “Even if there is not another world and good and bad deeds have no result, in this life I live devoid of hatred and enmity, happily and free from trouble.”

This is the second confidence he has. Or he can think: “If one who is evil is repaid with evil then how can suffering come to me because I do no evil?”

This is the third confidence he has. Or he can think: “If one who is evil is not repaid with evil I am pure nonetheless.” ~ A.I,192

As a mongoose approaches a snake to seize it only after having supplied his own body with an antidote, so too the earnest student of meditation, on approaching this world abounding as it is in anger and malice, plagued by quarrels, strife, contention and hatred, must first anoint his mind with the antidote of mettā. ~ Mil.394*

Fine or coarse, much or little, one can eat anything made with love. Indeed love is the highest taste. ~ Ja.III,145*

The naked ascetic Kassapa said to the Lord: “Reverend Gotama, it is hard to be a true monk, it is hard to be a true Brahman.” The Lord said: “That is what the world says Kassapa. But if a naked ascetic was to practise all kinds of self-mortification, and if this was the measure of difficulty, then it would not be true to say that it is hard to be a true ascetic or a true Brahman. And why? Because anyone, a householder, his son, even a slave girl who draws water, could go naked and practise self-mortification. But there is another type of asceticism about which it is really true to say that it is hard to be a true ascetic, a true Brahman. When one develops a mind free from hatred or ill-will, full of mettā, and by the destruction of the defilements dwells with a mind freed through insight, then that one is a true ascetic, a true Brahman.” ~ D.I,168

The monk who abides in mettā and has faith in the Buddha’s dispensation will walk the path of peace and attain the happiness of the cessation of conditioned things. ~ Dhp.368

A tree makes no distinction in the shade it gives. So too, the earnest student of meditation must make no distinction between any beings, but must develop mettā quite equally towards thieves, murderers, enemies and towards himself, thinking: “How may these beings be without enmity and without harm, how may they be at peace, secure and happy; how may they look after themselves?” ~ Mil.410*

For the mindful one, there is always good;
For the mindful one, happiness increases;
For the mindful one, things go better;
Yet he may not be freed from hate.

But one who both day and night
Takes delight in harmlessness,
Sharing mettā with all that lives –
That one has hate for none. ~ S.I,208

What is a monk’s wealth? Concerning this, one abides with the mind filled with mettā, compassion, sympathetic joy and equanimity, suffusing the first, second, third, and fourth quarters of the world. One abides suffusing the whole world, upwards, downwards, across, everywhere, with a mind filled with mettā, compassion, sympathetic joy and equanimity, abundant, unbounded, without hatred, without ill-will. This is a monk’s wealth. ~ D.III,78

The teacher cares for the disciples as a bird inspects her egg, a yak guards her tail, a mother her beloved child or a one-eyed man his only eye. ~ Ja.III,375*

Just as water cools both good and bad,
And washes away all impurity and dust,
In the same way you should develop thoughts of mettā
To friend and foe alike,
And having reached perfection in mettā,
You will attain enlightenment. ~ Ja.I,24 *

At that time, the Lord said to the monks: “Once upon a time, a bamboo acrobat set up his pole, called to his pupil, and said: ‘Now, my boy, climb the pole and stand on my shoulders’. ‘Alright, master’, said the pupil, and he did as he was told. Then the master said: ‘Now, my boy, you protect me and I will protect you, and protected and watched by each other we will do our act, get a good fee, and come down safe and sound from the bamboo pole’. But then the pupil said: ‘No master, no! That will not do. You look after yourself, and I will look after myself and thus watched and guarded each by himself, we will do our act, get a good fee, and come down safe and sound from the bamboo pole. That is the way to do it’.”Then the Lord said: “Just as the pupil said to the master ‘I will protect myself’ so should you practise the four foundations of mindfulness, which also means ‘I will protect others’. By protecting oneself, one protects others and by protecting others, one protects oneself. And how does one protect others by protecting oneself? It is by the repeated and frequent practice of meditation. And how does one protect oneself by protecting others? It is by practising patience, harmlessness, mettā and empathy.” ~ S.V,169

I am a friend to all, a helper to all.
I am sympathetic to all beings.
I develop a mind full of mettā,
And delight always in harmlessness.

I gladden my mind.
I make it immovable and unshakable.
I develop the Brahma Viharas
Not cultivated by evil people. ~ Th.645-649*

The noble quality of mettā should be thought about like this: “One concerned only with his own welfare, without concern for others, cannot achieve success in this world or happiness in the next. How then can one wishing to help all beings but not having mettā for himself succeed in attaining Nirvana? And if you wish to lead all beings to Nirvana, you should begin by wishing for their mundane welfare here and now.” One should think: “I cannot provide for the welfare and happiness of others merely by wishing it. Let me make an effort to accomplish it.” One should think: “Now I support them by promoting their welfare and happiness, and later they will be my companions in sharing the Dhamma.” Then one should think: “Without these beings, I could not perfect the requisites of enlightenment. Because they are the reason for practicing and perfecting all the Buddha-like qualities, these beings are for me the highest field of merit, the incomparable basis for planting wholesome roots, and thus the ultimate object of reverence.” So one should arouse an especially strong inclination towards promoting the welfare of all beings. And why should mettā be developed towards all beings? Because it is the foundation of compassion. For when one delights in providing for the welfare and happiness of other beings with an unbounded heart, the desire to remove their afflictions and suffering becomes strongly and firmly established. And compassion is the pre-eminent quality in Buddhahood; it is its basis, its foundation, its root, its head and its chief. ~ Cp-a.292*

With passions gone, faults dispelled
And with diligence both day and night
One should suffuse all directions
With a mind of boundless love. ~ Sn.507

Giving up ill-will and hatred, one abides with a mind of kindly compassion for all living beings and purifies the mind of that ill-will and hatred…

Giving up the taking of life, and laying aside the stick and the sword, one abides with care, empathy and kindly compassion for all living beings. ~ D.I,63;71

“That noble disciple who is without longing or hatred, who is unconfused, with all-around awareness and constant mindfulness, dwells pervading the four directions with a mind filled with mettā, compassion, sympathetic joy and equanimity. Above, below, across and everywhere, to all as to himself, he dwells pervading the whole world with a mind filled with mettā, compassion, sympathetic joy and equanimity that is expansive, pervasive, immeasurable and utterly devoid of hatred or enmity. And he knows: “Previously, my mind was narrow and undeveloped but now it is immeasurable and well developed. No measurable kamma remains or lingers in it. Now what do you think monks? If from his childhood a young man were to develop freedom of the mind by either mettā or compassion, sympathetic joy or equanimity would he do any bad kamma?”

“No Lord.”

“And could suffering affect him if he did no bad kamma?”

“No Lord. For how could one who does no bad kamma suffer?”

“Therefore, a man or a woman should develop this liberation of the mind by mettā and compassion, sympathetic joy and equanimity. No man or woman can take their body with them when they die. The core of beings is the mind. The noble disciple knows: ‘Whatever bad kamma I did in the past with this deed-born body will have all its results here. When the liberation of the mind by mettā, compassion, sympathetic joy and equanimity has been developed in this way, it leads a wise person to non-returning, should he not reach a higher attainment.” ~ A,V,299-300

Here a person dwells pervading the four directions with a mind filled with mettā, compassion, sympathetic joy and equanimity. Above, below, across and everywhere, to all as to himself, he dwells pervading the whole world with a mind filled with mettā, compassion, sympathetic joy and equanimity that is expansive, pervasive, immeasurable and utterly devoid of hatred or enmity. He savours it, desires it, delights in it. If he makes it stable, emphasises it, and spends time in it without falling away from it by the time he dies, then he is reborn amongst the heavenly host of Brahma. The lifespan of the heavenly host is an eon. An unenlightened being will remain there until his heavenly life is over and then he will be reborn maybe in purgatory, in the animal realm, or perhaps as a hungry spirit. A disciple of the Lord would remain there until his heavenly life is over too, but then he will attain complete Nirvana. This is the difference, the dissimilarity, the distinction and between the future and the rebirth of an instructed noble disciple and an uninstructed ordinary person. ~ A.II,129

What is a harmonious gathering? It is a gathering in which the monks live in concord, harmony and agreement, like milk and water mixed, looking upon each other with the eyes of mettā. This is called a harmonious gathering. And when they live like this they create much merit, they live in the highest manner, that is to say, in the liberation of the mind through sympathetic joy. When one is glad, joy arises, being joyful the body becomes tranquil, when the body is tranquil one feels happiness and when one is happy the mind becomes concentrated. ~ A.I,243

Just as it is difficult for bands of robbers to attack those families with few women but many men, so too, it is difficult for non-humans to attack one who had developed and cultivated the liberation of the mind through mettā. ~ S.II,264

There are these four basis of community. What four? Generosity and loving speech, doing good to others, and treating them impartially.

Generosity and loving speech, doing good and impartiality.
To the community and the world,
done now and then, here and there,
They are like the linchpin that keeps the wheel in motion.

If these basis of community did not exist,
Neither mother or father would receive
The measure or the worship which is their due. ~ A.II,32

There are these four types of people found in the world. What four? One who is concerned with neither his own welfare or the welfare of others; one who is concerned with the welfare of others but not his own; one who is concerned with his own welfare but not that of others; and one who is concerned with both his own welfare and that of others. Imagine a fire stick burning at both ends and smeared with cow dung in the middle; it would be useless as timber in either the village or the forest. The first person is like this. The one who is concerned with the welfare of others not his own is better than this. The one who is concerned with his own welfare but not that of others’ is better and more excellent still. And the one who is concerned with both his own and other’s welfare is, of these four people, the best, most excellent, the highest and the supreme. Just as from milk comes cream, from cream comes butter, from butter comes ghee and from ghee comes the skimming of ghee and that is considered the best; so too, of these four types of people found in the world the one who is concerned with both his own and others’ welfare is the best, most excellent, the highest and the supreme. ~ A.II,96

Having five qualities one who nurses the sick is qualified to do so. What five? He can prepare the medicine. He knows what medicine is suitable and what is not. He does not give the unsuitable, only the suitable. He nurses the sick with a mind of mettā, not out of desire for gain. He is unmoved when he has to deal with stool and urine, vomit and spittle. And from time to time he is able to instruct, inspire, enthuse and cheer the sick with the Dhamma. ~ A.III,144

For the attaining the highest knowledge and conduct reputation based on status, family or such conceited talk as; “You are worthy of me!” or “You are not worthy of me!” means nothing. Such notions are suitable only when giving in marriage or taking in marriage. Those who are entranced by reputation based on statue, family or such conceited talk as: “You are worthy of me” or “You are not worthy of me!” are far from attaining the highest knowledge and conduct. Rather, it is by abandoning such notions that one attains the highest knowledge and conduct. ~ D.I,99

With wealth earned by energetic striving, gathered by strength of arm and acquired by sweat of brow, righteously and lawfully, a clansman should honor, revere and worship his parents. And they being so honored, revered and worshipped will relate to him with a beautiful mind and with empathy, saying “May you live long and may you always be protected!” When a clansman’s parents relate to him with empathy it can be expected that he will flourish and not decline. ~ A.III,76-7

As the very nature of water is to be cool and calm, so too the earnest student of meditation, out of compassion for all beings, should possess patience, mettā and compassion. ~ Mil.383*

All the sacrificial rituals are not worth a sixteenth
Of a mind nourished by mettā,
Any more than all the stars can match
The radiance of the moon.

Not killing or encouraging killing,
Not conquering or encouraging conquest,
And freed from hatred towards anyone,
Are those who have mettā for everyone. ~ A.IV,151

Bail out this boat (i.e. oneself). Oh monk, bail it out with mettā,
And it will sail swiftly for you.
Cut out lust and ill-will and you will attain Nirvana.

Bail out this boat. Oh monk, bail it out with compassion,
And it will sail quickly for you.
Cut out lust and ill-will and you will attain Nirvana.

Bail out this boat. Oh monk, bail it out with sympathetic joy,
And it will sail quickly for you.
Cut out lust and ill-will and you will attain Nirvana.

Bail out this boat. Oh monk, bail it out with equanimity,
And it will sail quickly for you.
Cut out lust and ill-will and you will attain Nirvana. ~ Mv.III,421

One who neither strikes or kills or burn,
Or seeks to be a conqueror
And who loves all beings,
Will never meet with enmity.

One who is harmless towards all beings
Will never in his life come to harm.
If he is always kind to everyone
Who could be his enemy?

If one does not benefit oneself
How is it possible to benefit others?
With the mind controlled and the body disciplined,
What goal cannot be achieved?

Those who have love for themselves
And wish to be reborn in heaven,
Should attend to the Buddha’s teaching with respect and joy. ~ Dharmapada Sūtra, 167, 171, 189, 196